Folio: Magazine Honors The Modern Estate with Gold Award for Editorial Excellence

Editor-in-Chief Linda Donnelly accepting 2007 FOLIO: Eddie Award from FOLIO: Managing Editor Matt Kinsman

Editor-in-Chief Linda Donnelly accepting 2007 FOLIO: Eddie Award from FOLIO: Managing Editor Matt Kinsman

 

(Greenwich, Connecticut, September 26, 2007) – The Modern Estate, a new luxury home magazine based in Greenwich, Connecticut, which just released its First-Anniversary issue this week, won FOLIO: Magazine’s Gold Eddie Award, honoring Editorial Excellence, in the category of Consumer Shelter/Home Magazine. Other finalists in this category were Metropolitan Home and D Home magazines.
 
"This award is among the best validation we could want. The industry has recognized that we are firmly focused on achieving our editorial mission,” stated Linda Donnelly, co-owner, publisher, and editor-in-chief, after receiving this esteemed honor for the feature article “Gift of a Master,” an exclusive look at the famed Philip Johnson Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, at the awards gala held September 23 at the Marriott Marquis in New York City. In winning this award, The Modern Estate now joins the ranks of impressive past and current honorees such as Coastal Living, Elle Décor, Fine Homebuilding, Vogue Living, New York Spaces, etc.
 
The FOLIO: Awards is one of the largest and most prestigious publishing industry competitions. These awards recognize excellence in editorial content and magazine design. This year, approximately 3,000 entries were received, and more than 100 expert judges chose the finalists and ultimately the bronze, silver, and gold winners in each division. The competition is open to national and regional magazines in various categories, including consumer, B-to-B, nonprofit association, etc. Magazines are judged on how well they fulfill their stated mission, the quality of their content, and their overall design and production.
 
Being recognized for superior editorial content by colleagues in the publishing industry is a great honor, especially for such a young publication, and this prestigious award supports The Modern Estate’s mission of “providing – in exquisitely beautiful format – substantive information, expert advice, and reliable resources, so that owners of luxury homes can attain the maximum enjoyment from their estate(s).” This is just what The Modern Estate is all about…beauty and substance.
 
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For More Information:
Barbara Wilkov
203-912-3319
bwilkov@themodernestate.com
www.themodernestate.com

Here is Folio: show awards judge evaluation of The Modern Estate’s entry in the 2007 Eddie Awards competition—the article, “Gift of a Master” (by Michael Allan Torre, with a section by Richard Friswell), that eventually garnered a Gold Eddie.

The Modern Estate managed to create a fresh package out of one of the year's most publicized stories--the opening of Philip Johnson's Glass House estate to the public. The narrative is sharp with a strong, personal lead, and a truly resonant ending. After pages of sophisticated discussion of the significance and history of the estate to 20th century architecture, the article segues into what reads as an intimate guide to the buildings and ends with a lovely and intelligent twist: "...And then, after touring this odd and intriguing estate, you can return to the most important residence in the world--your home." This brings the article back to the reader, who had just spent the previous 12 pages in a state of awe and wonderment at Johnson's achievement, the place that he himself called home. What this ending does, however, is to impress upon the reader that, yes, this estate and the buildings within are amazing, an accomplishment, but it was also a home and there's no residence more important than that one that we each, individually, call home. This was a brilliant ending. The packaging of this article was likewise inspired. The selection of images (the buildings from various perspectives and the vintage photographs of Johnson at home) told the story as much as the article. The pull-quotes hit the high notes with telling words from the architect and added another dimension. The at-a-glance, full page guide to the estate with its no-nonsense listing of the buildings is one of the best reader-service graphics I've seen. Just when I thought this editorial, art and writing team could not top themselves, they did. Ira Grandberg's personal tale of meeting Johnson was an inspired addition as was Friswell's report on the Painting Gallery's art treasures. In terms of words, visuals, the number of entry points for the reader and voices (all of which harmonize), this is a multi-dimensional article of the highest production caliber. Bravo!

Here is Folio: show awards judge evaluation of The Modern Estate’s entry in the 2007 Eddie Awards competition—the article, “Gift of a Master” (by Michael Allan Torre, with a section by Richard Friswell), that eventually garnered a Gold Eddie.

The Modern Estate managed to create a fresh package out of one of the year's most publicized stories--the opening of Philip Johnson's Glass House estate to the public. The narrative is sharp with a strong, personal lead, and a truly resonant ending. After pages of sophisticated discussion of the significance and history of the estate to 20th century architecture, the article segues into what reads as an intimate guide to the buildings and ends with a lovely and intelligent twist: "...And then, after touring this odd and intriguing estate, you can return to the most important residence in the world--your home." This brings the article back to the reader, who had just spent the previous 12 pages in a state of awe and wonderment at Johnson's achievement, the place that he himself called home. What this ending does, however, is to impress upon the reader that, yes, this estate and the buildings within are amazing, an accomplishment, but it was also a home and there's no residence more important than that one that we each, individually, call home. This was a brilliant ending. The packaging of this article was likewise inspired. The selection of images (the buildings from various perspectives and the vintage photographs of Johnson at home) told the story as much as the article. The pull-quotes hit the high notes with telling words from the architect and added another dimension. The at-a-glance, full page guide to the estate with its no-nonsense listing of the buildings is one of the best reader-service graphics I've seen. Just when I thought this editorial, art and writing team could not top themselves, they did. Ira Grandberg's personal tale of meeting Johnson was an inspired addition as was Friswell's report on the Painting Gallery's art treasures. In terms of words, visuals, the number of entry points for the reader and voices (all of which harmonize), this is a multi-dimensional article of the highest production caliber. Bravo!

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